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Exclusive Song Premiere: Band of Heathens Will “Carry Your Love”
TUE SEPTEMBER 16, 2014 11:20 AM

In the year since the release of its most recent album, Sunday Morning Songs, Band of Heathens hasn’t been taking it easy. The band is still been writing and recording new songs, and looking for inspiration in new places: namely, by asking the question “what would Tom Petty do?”

“Carry My Love,” a new single the band wrote and recorded after the release of its 2013 album, was in some ways an exercise in creative freedom. “This is the first time we’ve gone into the studio not thinking about the song in the context of a whole album,” says the band’s co-frontman, Gordy Quist. “We booked one day in the studio to track just this one song, mixed it the next day, and mastered it the day after that. It feels fresh being able to finish a song, record it quickly, and then set it free.”

The song that Band of Heathens has set free (and is also the namesake for their current tour) is a big, poppy, anthemic piece of rock and roll, and it makes sense that—when contemplating how to develop the chorus to “Carry My Love”—they’d look for inspiration in the work of Petty, whose Damn The Torpedoes album they had covered from start to finish as part of their most recent Halloween show. “When we got to the chorus, we thought, ‘Man, what would Tom Petty do here?’ There wasn’t one particular Petty song that we were using for inspiration, but it was helpful to imagine what we thought he might do for a chorus in this song.”

Give a listen to “Carry Your Love” below and decide for yourself if you think Band of Heathens nailed it.

 

(Photo by Courtney Chavanell, courtesy Band of Heathens)

 

September 9, 2014 – The Band of Heathens “Carry Your Love Tour 2014″ kicks off this Wednesday in Phoenix, AZ at the Rhythm Room and continues throughout the western US and mountain states.  The band will be debuting the new song “Carry Your Love” and we’re excited to announce that Texas Monthly will be exclusively streaming the track starting next week!

Until then, here’s a brief video of the making of the song.  We hope you enjoy it.  Please check www.bandofheathens.com/tour for the latest schedule and share with your friends!

CARRY YOUR LOVE TOUR 2014

Wed Sep 10 – Phoenix, AZ

Thu Sep 11 – Los Angeles, CA

Fri Sep 12 – Bakersfield, CA

Sat Sep 13 – Templeton, CA

Sun Sep 14 – San Francisco, CA

Mon Sep 15 – Folsom, CA

Tue Sep 16 – Eugene, OR

Wed Sep 17 – Bellingham, WA

Thu Sep 18 – Bainbridge Island, WA

Fri Sep 19 – Seattle, WA

Sat Sep 20 – Portland, OR

Tue Sep 23 – Boise, ID

Wed Sep 24 – Salt Lake City, UT

Thu Sep 25 – Steamboat Springs, CO

Fri Sep 26 – Evergreen, CO

Sat Sep 27 – Austin, TX

Sun Sep 28 – Bryan, TX

Thu Oct 2 – Little Rock, AR

Fri Oct 3 – Shreveport, LA

Sat Oct 4 – Greenville, MS

 

http://www.glidemagazine.com/121142/band-heathenslukas-nelson-promise-real-scoot-inn-austin-tx-71214-show-review/

 

July 15, 2014 by 

bandofheathens54

Songwriting and guitar playing were front row center at the Scoot Inn in Austin on Saturday night with a double bill shared by Band of Heathens and Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real. The show took on added significance given that both acts have roots in the “Live Music Capital of the World”; Band of Heathens got their start in Austin and made a name for themselves gigging at local clubs, and Lukas just happens to be the son of a certain Red-Headed Stranger with the last name Nelson, which basically makes him royalty in these parts. The two bands were a fitting match given their penchant for writing quality lyrics balanced with a level of instrumental prowess that makes for top notch live performances.

Band of Heathens got the fire started with a set of charming country rock. Much like The Band – who are clearly a major influence on these guys – the members of the Heathens each possess a strong singing voice and lyrical ability. They also tap into a range of genres relating to various types of Southern music, which they put on display with opening tune “Should Have Known Better,” a song reminiscent of the Black Crowes with a gospel-tinged clap along beat. On “Miss My Life” singer Ed Jurdi wailed out vocals like the estranged son of Levon Helm and Chris Robinson while engaging in dueling slide guitar play with Gordy Quist, all on top of a boogie woogie piano.

.__D4Q4892 .__D4Q4911.__D4Q4932.__D4Q4959.__D4Q4969.__D4Q5015.__D4Q5265.__D4Q5423.__D4Q5441   bandofheathensaustin

 

Seizing on the momentum of those songs and catchy rocker “Shake the Foundation,” the band turned towards their latest album, Sunday Morning Record, with the somber but uplifting “Caroline Williams” and a “Shotgun” that brought to mind Harry Nilsson’s “Everybody’s Talkin.’” “LA County Blues” saw the Heathens letting loose and tapping into more free form jamming, and keeping the spiritual mood high with the hippie gospel of “Sunday Morning.” The audience went wild for the band’s flawless rendition of the Beatles classic “Maybe I’m Amazed,” only to explode when they broke into an all out psychedelic dance jam. Between their heartfelt lyrics, rich harmonies and grandiose instrumentation, the Band of Heathens set the stage just right for Lukas Nelson and showed Austin once again why they are one of the finest bands this town has produced in recent years.

bandofheathensaustin2

At the young age of 25, Lukas Nelson comes across as a confident bandleader with plenty of bravado but none of the ego you’d expect from the son of one of country music’s greatest heroes. When he hit the stage at the Scoot Inn with a beaming grin, Nelson and his band appeared genuinely happy and surprised to be playing for the large crowd. Those who hadn’t seen Nelson yet and came to the show expecting a younger duplicate of Willie quickly realized that you won’t find that, but rather an eager musician searching for his own voice.

Throughout their set the band seemed to take pride in being adventurous, switching their sound from funk to soul to reggae and pure rock ‘n’ roll on a song by song basis. Slicing through it all was the scorching guitar work of Nelson who, while no doubt rooted in the psychedelic blues of Stevie Ray Vaughan and Jimi Hendrix, took on the role of musical chameleon by complimenting the mood of each song without overdoing it. That being said, it was hard not to marvel at Nelson’s uncanny ability to jump so high and shred the guitar with his teeth. The band even slayed an unexpected cover of Paul Simon’s “Diamonds on the Souls of Her Shoes.” Nelson and his band closed the night with a bang when they invited the Band of Heathens onstage for a group hoot of the Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy For the Devil,” sending the audience into the night with the feeling that they are both acts capable of taking their music to the biggest stages.

Photos by Suzanne Cordeiro. 

 

July 10, 2014 – Ed Jurdi of The Band of Heathens describes the art of songwriting as a way to connect with people with big-picture ideas that strike a common chord.

“Everybody sees the world through a different lens, but when you’re writing about those things you’re able to communicate your experiences with people who don’t know you at all,” he said. “The magic about music, literature and films is that other people have been through those things.

“When you can listen to what somebody has done, understand where they’ve been, understand that they have loved before or miss somebody or they want to be somewhere else, it lets us feel a little less alone in the world.”

The Band of Heathens will perform on Friday with Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real at Sam’s Burger Joint.

The band’s fourth studio album, last year’s “Sunday Morning Record,” captured some of the trials and travails of lineup changes, births of children, separations on the road and moving Jurdi’s family to Asheville, North Carolina, from Austin, where he’d lived for eight years.

Jurdi, Gordy Quist and Colin Brooks — all songwriters with solo albums — joined together after sitting in on each other’s sets to form the band that soon would be known for pleasing harmonies, powerful wide-ranging lyrics and an American roots blend of country, rock, blues, R&B, gospel and soul that won honors as best new band at the Austin Music Awards.

Their self-titled debut studio album in 2008 and 2009′s “One Foot in the Ether” both shot to No. 1 on the national Americana charts.

While touring to support the 2011 album “Top Hat Crown and the Clapmaster’s Son,” Brooks left to pursue new projects. Founding member/bassist Seth Whitney and drummer John Chipman soon followed. Only keyboardist Trevor Nealon stayed on.

Jurdi and Quist took stock of the situation and moved forward, recruiting Richard Millsap on drums and Scott Davis on bass.

“The new guys were sympathetic with the vibe and they brought a new energy and fresh inspiration,” Jurdi said. “I can’t articulate how it affected the sound; it’s an esoteric thing. But when you figure out how to work with people when playing music, you just do what sounds good.”

Jurdi said the band continued to evolve, and he and Quist did as collaborators, writing songs that entertain and move themselves while trying to mine new territory.

“’Sunday Morning Record’ is a snapshot of time, like all our records have been, but it’s a little more introspective,” Jurdi said. “It runs the gamut from joy to sorrow, to pain, longing and redemption during the time period when that stuff was happening.

“Movement and transition also are big themes — people changes, geography changes, life changes.”

He said the response from fans has been great. New songs that stand out before the crowds include “Shotgun,” about living through a bitter breakup; the upheaval-strewn “Miss My Life”; and “Shake the Foundation,” about betrayals.

Meanwhile, they’re compiling material for the next album.

“We’re finishing songs, getting them in working condition and then we’ll look at what we have,” Jurdi said. “If I had to guess, it will be more up-tempo than ‘Sunday Morning Record,’ more rock ‘n’ roll. We won’t really know until we get the songs together in the studio.”

One thing’s a given, though — the songs will work that lyrical magic to connect with listeners.

john@johngoodspeed.com

 

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140617/PUB03/140619984

June 17 , 2014 – Ed Jurdi has made a name for himself as co-founder of Texas group The Band of Heathens.

And while the band started in Austin and has rocked PBS series “Austin City Limits” as well as many a Texan venue, Jurdi actually grew up in Andover.

So it will be something of a homecoming for the Massachusetts native when The Band of Heathens takes the stage at the Narrows Center for the Arts in Fall River on June 18. Don’t miss out on this one. These guys have earned a reputation as an epic live act.

Since forming in Austin in 2005, The Band of Heathens has been nominated as a Best Emerging Band at the Austin Music Awards and in various categories at the Americana Music Awards. They’ve performed at massive national music fests such as Lollapalooza, SXSW and Bonnaroo, as well as in venues of all sizes around the United States and Europe.

The Heathens have a great Americana/folk/rock twang, with a catalog that swings from foot-stomping rompers to acoustic thinkers.

And they sure have great taste: Their song “LA County Blues” about Hunter S. Thompson — one of my heroes — starts with a riff that smacks of “Homegrown” by Neil Young, another one of my heroes. Great stuff. Look up the YouTube clip of the band playing the song on Austin City Limits in 2009.

While you’re at it, look up their song “Cornbread.” It sounds like a 1930s blues song sung on a back porch down South.

Their latest and fourth studio album, “Sunday Morning Record” (2013), is as rootsy and soulful as the “clubhouse” in which it was recorded. Google “Shotgun” and “Records in Bed,” which embody the band’s punchy-yet-introspective style.

“We recorded it in Austin at George Reiff’s Finishing School, which has a great clubhouse kind of atmosphere,” Jurdi told me. “It’s a great place for making music and creating with your friends. That was the vibe we were going for — sort of a lived-in, homey type of feel.”

Jurdi told me he has “too many influences to list properly. Everything from Miles Davis to Kris Kristofferson and some stuff in between. Just a few of the artists that we listen to in the van are Dawes, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Bahamas, Luther Dickinson and Lake Street Dive.”

Jurdi has “a lot of memories of music growing up” in Andover, he said. “There was always lots of music around the house when I was a kid. My dad played guitar and sang songs a lot; my mom cleaned the house listening to (The Beatles’ classic) ‘Abbey Road.’”

He attended University of New Hampshire before heading out to Texas. “I didn’t major in music, but it was a part of my minor, along with hanging out and listening to records.”

He met Quist and the other original member, Colin Brooks, when they all ended up sharing the bill one night at Momo’s, a now-defunct Austin club. Brooks has since left the band, and the line-up has changed a few times over the years; the current incarnation is Jurdi, Quist, keyboardist Trevor Nealon and drummer Richard Millsap.

“When we started, we were really only interested in having fun and jamming together. Anything else was just gravy,” Jurdi said.

I asked him how they came up with their name — there are various reasons stated online — but it seems not even Jurdi knows:

“That’s become a bit of a mystery,” he said. “It was bestowed upon us by perhaps a high-ranking member of the clergy of Austin Music. It was either that or a friend came up with it. I’m not sure.”

The Band of Heathens plays the Narrows Center for the Arts in Fall River on June 18 at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $23 at the door. For more information, visit narrowscenter.org or call (508) 324-1926.

Lauren Daley is a freelance writer and music columnist. Contact her at ldaley33@gmail.com.

 

http://thelivebeat.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/the-band-of-heathens-records-in-your-bed-good-for-your-soul/

THE BAND OF HEATHENS – RECORDS IN YOUR BED – GOOD FOR YOUR SOUL

The Band of Heathens is making the touring rounds through New England and New York this week at some of our most warm and intimate venues – it’s a real treat to see and hear THIS band perform in such tiny rooms. Click on the venue link in your area for more info on the specific performances. And press play on some of the bands music to listen while you read The Live Beat’s interview with Ed Jordi, guitars and vocals. The band is touring in support of their latest studio recording, Sunday Morning Record, which puts some of their most personal and heartfelt story songs together with gorgeous and melodic, country soul music.

As always, we’ll see you at the show!

Tuesday June 17 – Fairfield, CT – Fairfield Theater Company

Wednesday June 18 – Fall River, MA – Narrows Center for the Arts

Thursday June 19 – Northampton, MA – Iron Horse

Friday June 20 – Boston, MA – Cafe 939

Saturday June 21 – New York, NY – Hill Country Barbecue

New England Roots?

The Live Beat - I understand that there is a New England connection to the Band of Heathens? Can you put that into perspective for our New England based readership?

Ed Jurdi LiveEd Jurdi – “No, the band was formed in Austin. I just grew up in Andover, Massachusetts, and spent many years kind of touring around New England and doing my own stuff up here. You know, I still have a lot of friends and family up there and a lot of nice ties, so it’s always nice to be back up there and see some old souls and stuff like that.”

The Live Beat - How was it you wound up in Austin?

Ed Jurdi – “I always kind of traveled a lot playing music and was interested in traveling and exploring new places. At some point I just kind of wanted to try going somewhere else and checking it out and Austin kept coming up on the list, you know? So I just wound up flying myself down there, living there and meeting all the guys that wound up being in the band. We all shared a night at a club in at a club in Austin doing a residency. We just pretty loosely fell into a collective and started doing shows together on Wednesday nights and did that for about a year. We were doing Wednesday nights at a club called Momo’s in Austin, which is no longer there. I met a lot of musicians and Gordy happened to be one of them, we just clicked pretty well. Each of us was doing a solo thing, and just kind of condensed our things into a band. It was just a lot of fun and that’s where it all started for us.”

 

Influences

The Live Beat - The music of Band of Heathens has a very laid back, acoustic and western feeling, as well as a feel and sound of early seventies music, such as The Eagles, The Harmonies on “Miss My Life,” stick out to me for instance. Who were some of your Influences, and how have those influences affected your musical choices and songwriting/lyrical choices?

Jordi mentions having listened to everything from The Beatles and Stones and James Taylor and Cat Stevens, old soul and R&B, Wilson Picket, Otis Redding, Sly & The Family Stone, and really anything and everything in between. But, he adds, those influences worked into his songwriting from the background.

Ed Jurdi – “I think, like anything else, your influences maybe inform what you do on a deeper subconscious level, you know? I just think it’s the kind of thing where, as you’re becoming a musician, or whatever it is you’re doing, these pieces get put into your tool box, for lack of a better metaphor. You start to be able to call on these things. That’s kind of how you learn what you’re doing, you listen to stuff and you figure out how it was done. And then, hopefully, you take that and make it into your own thing. I do think the last record we did was a more acoustic thing and a laid back kind of thing, with a early ‘70s singer songwriter vibe like you’re saying. I think the band live, and in general – like if you look at our whole catalogue – it’s kind of an interesting progression of sounds. So we just happened to have been in that mind set when we made this new record, representing the quieter side of our songs.”

Cha… cha… cha… changes!

The Live Beat - You’ve described SMR is “…a record of changes.” Can you describe some of the changes and experiences that each of you were going through at the time frame that you were recording songs for this record? How did these experiences influence the song writing for this record?

Ed Jurdi – “Well, you know, I think it’s hard for me to say on that because I’m so  a

The Live Beat - But somewhere along the line you lost a band member or two, Colin Brooks? Did he leave or was he pushed out? Are you all in good terms? Wasn’t he a co-vocalist and songwriter as well with the two of you?

Ed Jurdi – “He left, and we’re all on good terms. I think like anything else, it gets to a point where you have to make big decisions and try to find different paths in your lives. You know, to do this at a high level and to be good at it and feel like you’re plugged into something, it’s kind of gotta be all or nothing, and I think other people that do it know what I’m talking about. In terms of it being all or nothing, I me an it’s really gotta be you’re first priority, to be a part of it, to chase the songs, you know? To be a part of touring, to be a part of writing, to be a part of being on the road. Just being a part of a fraternity, there is a long tradition of minstrel singers and…[pauses] I guess for some musicians and I think certainly for us, that’s the way it is, you know, it is kind of all or nothing. I kind of just think it was time [for Brooks] to recharge the batteries.”

The Live Beat - Did the band members’ departure cause you both to consider the future of the band?

Ed Jurdi – “Well certainly it caused us to consider the future and how are we going to put something together and what’s it going to look like? But in terms of us wanting to continue on and do it no it didn’t. We were pretty sound, we still had trevor in our band – he was our keyboard player and is still with us and still wanting to do something too, so it felt like we still had a good nucleus in place and we could forge forward and still make something good, you know? That was always the idea.”

Grey Areas between black and white

“A lot of stuff is up for grabs and you don’t know what’s going to happen, and a lot of times that you think you know what’s going to happen, the opposite happens. And almost never in life what you think is going to happen, actually happens.”

The Live Beat - You’ve called SMR a record of exploring the “grey areas” between the black and white, and Gordy called the songs some of the “most personal songs” the band has written and released. Can you offer some examples of those grey areas and personal experiences and how they fit into the songs on SMR?

Ed Jurdi – “Yea I think a lot of the record is more of a narrative story in terms of not knowing what’s going to happen at the end of the story. It’s something that’s still in motion. I think a lot of times in life, there’s this evolution of fate! What something meant at one point in time may not be what it means now. So rather than these short songs that are that are just sort of character driven or some sort of story song, I think a lot of these songs are more about an emotional state, or a state of being, you know? Whether it be longing or love or loss or some sort of resolution, or affirmation or some sort of release. I think there is a lot of that kind of vibe and I think the music supports that as well. It’s just kind of more of a mood or an atmosphere and I think we were after that more so than we have been in the past.”

 

The Live Beat - How and when did you write “Texas” in particular? An emotional goodbye to a state where you spent so much of your life?

Ed Jurdi – “I guess in retrospect yea. At the time I’m not sure I was totally cognizant of that, but I think that song is a good example of some of the grey areas and muddy waters and this idea of things being in transition; of there not being a beginning, middle and an end. A lot of stuff is up for grabs and you don’t know what’s going to happen, and a lot of times that you think you know what’s going to happen, the opposite happens. And almost never in life what you think is going to happen, actually happens. Let me put it another way, very rarely when you get somewhere does it look the way you thought it was going to look.”

 

The Live Beat - Was the recording done at George Reiff’s home studio? What made this place so conducive to writing and recording songs?

Ed Jurdi – “Well George is a great engineer and producer first of all, so that was kind of the reason we ended up working with him. We had done Top Hat Clown… [& The Clapmaster's Son] with him as well, and we’d known him for a while and he’s also a good friend, so that was another part of it. We really wanted people that we knew and that we trusted to work with on this. And he just happened to have a studio in his home so that is kind of a whole other level of it just being a good atmosphere and a good mindset to play music in. Not really rigid, as playing music in a traditional studio can be, you know? This was just sitting in a house playing music and being really relaxed and in a good headspace to create. All those things kind of made he place an ideal option for this record.”

The Live Beat - The Live element and environment obviously means a lot to both you and Gordy as songwriters and musicians – you’ve released a number of live recordings as albums, and you record most of your shows and allow fans to purchase the recording after the show – isn’t that correct? Why does the band put such an emphasis on performances?

Ed Jurdi – “Well I think it’s the other half of the equation. If you’re making records or you’re a recording artist, going out and playing live another big component of the profession. I guess it’s not for all artists and The Beatles would be a classic example of a band that was just amazing that just at some point just decided it was just not playing wise. But for us, it’s an opportunity to connect with music fans, with an audience. And I think there is something very unique and special about that connection. You’re only going to have the chance to make that connection one time. Ever…no matter what. You can only be in one place, one time, and have it go the way that it is going to go. There are so many variables. So it’s been kind of our focus to just say ‘…hey, every night is going to be different, let’s really try to make something special of this.’ We’re not really the kind of band that plays our stuff the same way every night, or that plays the same songs every night. So it’s really just our opportunity to make something special happen so that the audience and the band both have a good time with it. Sometimes you can be part of the most special moments, both the band and the audience, and when it’s really good, your all sharing in that moment. I don’t know if there is another word for it except magic!”

 

The Live Beat - speaking of magic, What do you hope someone who comes out to your show, a new fan or someone who has been with you for years, comes away with from a particular performance?

Ed Jurdi – “Well, to have a good time really. Not to be to simplistic about it, but at the end of the day that’s what music is supposed to do really. I mean, whether it’s identifying with a sad song that helps make you feel better about yourself, or if it’s a happy song and the tempo just makes you want to jump out of your seat and clap your hands and dance! It’s really simple stuff that we tend to take for granted, it’s just kind of a release, a little bit of something that soothes your soul, you know? Cause when we’re playing, that’s what we’re after, and it definitely feels like the audience gives it back to us. That’s really it, be a part of something that’s bigger than yourself, be a part of an audience and having a shared moment with some other people.”

The Live Beat – “And you release your recordings on your own, with no label to put marketing and promotion and press behind it as you go on the road? Is the music distribution system broken? Can a musician/band have any hope to make a living any more recording music and hoping to sell it? Are you a fan of the Spotify/Pandora subscription/streaming model?”

Ed Jurdi – “No, I don’t think the music distribution system is broken at all; for us, we still sell CDs and records, so were going to keep on making them. For certain kinds of music, it’s really singles driven and most of their sales are digitally based. I have seen, since this band started, the amount of music that we get to people through the digital realm has certainly increased tremendously. So I think people are pretty aware that going forward that digital is going to be the future of music delivery. That being said, I think there is always going to be this niche market of people that want to purchase vinyl and want to buy records and do that sort of authentic thing and that’s great too.”

The Live Beat - Your preferred choice for listening to music?

Ed Jurdi – “ All of them, I mean ideally vinyl if I’ve got the time, if I’m home and I have a moment to sit and relax and enjoy something – it’s always vinyl. I just enjoy the whole aesthetic of it. I’m one of those people that really likes to look at the art work and read the liner notes and do all that stuff. But I’m totally aware that a lot of people don’t care to do that stuff, just don’t have the time to dedicate to it. I certainly don’t have the time either, so it’s nice if you’re taking a drive and you have an iPod around, or if you have spotify around, the ability to be able to listen to the music that you might want to listen to. That’s an amazing convenience, an awesome gift. If someone could have told me fifteen years ago that I would be able to have all my music in my pocket – I would have been like, that’s amazing!”

The Live Beat - What’s in the tour van CD player on your current road trip? What music are you guys listening to? Anything new? Anything classic? How do you all go about choosing what to listen to?

Ed Jurdi – “We were listening to this guy this morning, Stargell Simpson, he’s kind of an old time country singer. He’s got a really cool record that just came out. I’ve been listening to this band Lake Street Dive a little bit, it’s pretty cool. Chris Robinson’s Brotherhood‘s new record is very good, those guys are great. And there’s always a great rotation of older stuff too, older country or blues stuff; seventies singer songwriter or rock n roll. it’s pretty diverse, everyone is pretty all over the map in what we all listen to.”

 

http://medfield.wickedlocal.com/article/20140612/ENTERTAINMENT/140618407/12439/ENTERTAINMENT/?Start=1

  • By Jay N. Miller
    For The Patriot Ledger
    Posted Jun. 13, 2014 @ 7:00 am

    They call themselves Band of Heathens, but the Austin, Texas, quintet could just as well be called Band of Songwriters, as no less than four of them contribute to the band’s songbook.

    Band of Heathens’ fourth studio record – and seventh overall –“Sunday Morning Record” was released last September and they’ve been touring behind it ever since. Next week they kick off their latest national tour with a couple of dates in the Boston area. On Wednesday (June 18) they’ll be headlining the Narrows Center for the Arts in Fall River ( 8 p.m. show, tickets $20 in advance, $23 at the door), and on Friday June 20 they’re performing at Boston’s Cafe 939 (939 Boylston St., Boston, 8 p.m. show, tickets $15 in advance, $18 day of show.)

    Band of Heathens formed in 2005 in Austin, when three musicians who’d been playing as solo singer-songwriters joined forces. Ed Jurdi plays guitar and keyboards, Gordy Quist plays guitar and lap steel, and original member Colin Brooks was also a guitar-playing singer-songwriter. Keyboardist Trevor Nealon joined in 2009, and he began adding to the songwriting mix.

    The most recent album came after a period of some upheaval for the group, as Brooks left at the end of 2011, and the rhythm section they’d had departed soon after. Richard Millsap, a friend of their first drummer, slid easily into the drummer’s chair, while the band used several bassists for a while. About a year ago, songsmith Scott Davidson, who’d been playing guitar in Hayes Carll’s band, was recruited into Band of Heathens, where his pals convinced him to play bass.

    In the current lineup, Jurdi and Quist are the main songwriters, but Nealon and Davidson also pen plenty of material too. The other side of the group’s topsy-turvy period a couple years back involved Jurdi moving to Asheville, North Carolina. Both he and Quist have young families, and so a lot of the songs on “Sunday Morning Record” involve characters trying to balance that with a musician’s life on the road. It’s a heady mix of roots rock with a twang, but also with some superb rock dynamics, and the advantage of two or three exemplary vocalists, who are also able to harmonize sweetly.

    The new songs, and the group started with 30-odd numbers before settling on 11 for the album, were more mature, a little introspective, and most notably, predominantly acoustic-based. That was a big step in a new direction for a group that built its reputation around Austin’s bustling music scene with sizzling concerts, whose first two albums were live performances, and who released a later concert album that included two CDs and two DVDs.

    “When we recorded that album we knew we were doing something different, and we wanted a different approach,” said Quist, from his Austin home. “The interesting thing we found was when the record first came out, everybody wanted to talk about how acoustic and mellow it was, how personal the songs were, and what a departure it was from our previous albums. But when we began touring, and people got to hear and see how the new material works into the live show, they could see how it isn’t necessarily mellow or even acoustic in our shows. We’re still primarily a rock band.

    “We were definitely going for a certain sound on ‘Sunday Morning Record,” said Quist. “All that is true, and I think we achieved that. But I also think that playing that music live adds another layer to it, and it fits into our previous work very well.”

    Songwriting with this group comes in many varied methods, as you might expect

    “Ed and I work solo or in collaboration,” said Quist. “Sometimes one of us will come in with a song that came out close to completely finished. At other times, one of the other of us will have just a verse, maybe just a line, and we’ll send it to the other and start working together. Then when we finish, the band guys take their crack at it, and the songs always end up very different from where we started. In fact, I’m usually surprised where some of our songs end up.”

    Band of Heathens has the advantage of being able to write new music almost constantly, whether on the road or while taking a break at home. The quintet just returned from a European jaunt, and took a couple weeks off before embarking on the U.S. tour.

    “We can write just about anywhere,” said Quist. “We’re all different but basically we’re all reaching into the truth of humanity in our songwriting, trying to find ideas that resonate with all kinds of people. We don’t start with any special notions, or try to write in specific styles. A song could be anything – a rock song with the full band, or a solo acoustic number. As a writer I think that attitude is very freeing, knowing you could go either way, or take something in any direction. We can let a song go wherever it wants to go.”

    That open-ended approach also translates to Band of Heathens’ performances, where the quintet follows its instincts to expand and extend the tunes. A Band of Heathens concert is more than likely to include some lengthy jams, where the songs evolve over time and morph into new shapes.

    “I think the band, with this lineup, is in a really good place right now,” said Quist. “We’re all healthy, musically it is the best the band has ever sounded, and everybody is having a good time. The new people in the mix allow the music to go in different directions.

    “Scott Davidson is the latest member to join, a year ago, and he’s a better guitar player than I am,” Quist pointed out. “Scott can essentially play anything with strings, has really good ears, and is also a good songwriter who gels with all the rest of us. Trevor, who’s been with us five years now, also writes, so we’re compiling a lot of new songs. In the next few months we’ll start going through all the new music and figuring out what we want on the next record.”

    Band of Heathens has performed before in the Boston area, “about four or five times,” according to Quist, at various venues, including Great Scott in Allston, and The Sinclair in Cambridge.“We’ve been off the European tour a couple weeks now, and I can’t wait to get back on tour with the guys,” said Quist. “That’s how well things are going – we all love what we’re doing, and enjoy being around the other people in the band, the audiences have been very receptive, and it’s just a good time for everybody.”

     

 

http://www.thebluegrasssituation.com/read/catching-up-with-band-of-heathens

May 16, 2014 – Unlike many outfits who take years to reap their just rewards, Band of Heathensworked their way into the spotlight fairly quickly. It wasn’t that they had any grand designs early on, or even had any thoughts about becoming a band in the first place. What began initially as a series of Wednesday night jam sessions at a club in their native Austin — an event they dubbed “The Good Time Supper Club” — eventually coalesced into an outfit that quickly gained attention and soon climbed to the top of the Americana charts. They certainly possessed all the goods they needed from the very beginning, thanks to a pair of seasoned singer/songwriters in Ed Jurdi and Gordy Quist, each of whom had pursed solo careers prior to participating in those impromptu gatherings.

True to form, the group’s initial albums were recorded live prior to releasing their eponymous studio debut in 2008. And while concert recordings continue to find a place in their catalog, Band of Heathens have shown a decided studio savvy as well. With the core outfit currently consisting of Jordi and Quist on vocals and guitars and later recruits Trevor Nealon on keyboards and Richard Millsap playing drums, they released their finest effort to date last year, the aptly titled Sunday Morning Record. Accessible to a fault, and exceedingly mellow to boot, it flows with a natural ease usually accomplished by those with far more track time under their belts. From its graceful opener “Shotgun,” through to the final wistful refrains of “Texas,” it proves its mettle as both a set of songs that’s radio-ready, and a disc that might even offer sweet salvation on a particularly demanding morning after. Seven years on, they’ve earned all admiration that they’ve managed to muster. We recently caught up with Ed Jordi on the phone from Asheville, N.C. and offered him the opportunity to delineate the band’s unlikely trajectory.

Your band came together in an unusual way, recording solo albums before the band even started.

I think everything about our band, in terms of the way things are usually done, has been ass backwards. We all were doing solo stuff and then this thing came together and took on a life of its own. You have moments in your life where things just sort of happen. We were all doing our own thing and just happened to start playing together, and it just sort of took off. It was a pretty unique sound and we all agreed it might be something worth exploring. It wasn’t like a discussion ever happened early on, but as we got into it we were kind of getting back what we put into it. We were feeling good about where it was taking us, so following that muse led us to where we are now.

Was there ever any second thoughts about putting your solo careers on the back burner?

The evolution was so slow and natural that that thought never entered into it. We were doing our weekly gig for like a year. That’s all we did was play once a week in Austin while doing our solo stuff at the same time. So it was like, what if we do a week of shows in Dallas or Houston? So we started doing that and it was going great. We were doing the other stuff all along, and it was kind of like this is going so well and we’re really having fun, and where the solo stuff was once a priority, let’s make this a priority for a little while and see how it goes. We all felt there was room to do what ever we wanted to do on an individual creative level. Whenever you’re playing in an ensemble, that’s kind of what it is. It’s kind of a balance of knowing what the group is doing while also being creatively fulfilled individually. The answer was yes to both of those things. So it was really a no-brainer. Let’s give this a shot for a little while and see what happens.

So from the way you describe it, it sounds like a very gradual transition.

Yeah, and on another level, all of us, as individual songwriters, we still got to present our own material and we had a great band that everyone could play off of and with, and in effect do only a third of the work. For me, being in a band has always been the goal. Even when you’re doing your own thing, you want to have a group of people around you that can play off of and with. As a music fan, that’s the thing that always resonated with me. Watching a group of people onstage playing music together and interacting and having things happen in the moment. And so being a part of that interaction, that’s the thing about making music that’s special for me at least.

Still, was there ever a feeling that you had all these songs that you had written and now you have to share space with some other songwriters and maybe it could be a bit inhibiting?

[Chuckles] I’m sure that could come up, but we’ve done a pretty good job of balancing it all. If anyone has a wild hair about that, go ahead and do a solo record. We’ve been so busy with this. that never came up in a big way. In fact, I think it’s allowed us to be more prolific. We pretty much release an album every year, which is a pretty nice deal because we keep creating new material. So when we go out on the road, there’s always fresh material to play.

Your music was received really well at the outset. You garnered a lot of acclaim from the first note you released and instantly hit the highest peaks of the Americana charts. But did that in turn put a lot of pressure on you, knowing that you already had a high bar to maintain?

On a business level, it does, but creatively that’s always been a very secondary thing to us. I never equated our albums going to number one with the quality of the work. Maybe it was an affirmation of the quality of the work, but the only judges of that are the guys in the band. Do we like it and do we feel good about putting it out? If it’s the best work we’re doing in the time that we’re doing it, then that’s it. When we finished the new record and played it out, it felt like the best thing we had ever done. That’s just my opinion though. Everyone receives it differently, from critics to fans and everyone in between, and that’s their right to have that opinion. But at the end of the day, all we can do is base it on the work that we’re doing. Because otherwise, it’s kind of unachievable. I have no idea how to make music that I think someone else thinks is great or going to be number one. It’s such a nebulous field of reference.

Are you guys working on something new now? Are you constantly writing?

I try to. We’re on the road a lot so it gets tough to finish stuff. But we’re always mining and cultivating. I keep a bunch of journals and I’m always writing stuff down. I jot down my musical ideas or record them on my digital recorder, maybe a little hook and little chorus. I’m always compiling this stuff, and then when I think it’s time to start finishing off some of these ideas, I’ll do some serious writing. Hopefully, we’ll have time to get into the studio and do another record this year. That’s the goal right now. That’s ultimately the most exciting part for me, writing and recording new material and seeing a project through to its conclusion. That’s a very satisfying part of this whole world.

Do you guys co-write together or compose individually?

There’s a little bit of everything. Most of our stuff kind of starts from zero, and then we co-write the rest of it. Other stuff we write individually and then bring it to the band and we all contribute to the arrangements. Some stuff is a little bit of both. At very least, the songs get bounced around within the group and everyone gives some feedback on what they want their role to be or if they have some ideas on what can improve the song. It’s always a very collaborative process going to that end result.

Your name was actually the result of mistaken identity, was it not?

That’s totally true. We were doing this Wednesday night thing and had been doing it for a few months and we were calling it “The Good Time Supper Club,” because it was kind of like an evening of different entertainers. We started it off and then some of our friends came down, and it became a big deal. Everybody started coming down just to see what was going to happen. Someone made some posters for the show and they started calling us ‘those heathens” or something like that.

How did they come up with that?

I have no idea. But it got to be known around town that on Wednesday night, you could see Those Heathens. So everyone just started called us Those Heathens. It was just kind of like, well, OK, that’s cool. At the time it was funny because there was a little bit of controversy about religion and how it’s got its place in our society and how the conservatives were banging the drum about family values. If nothing else, it leveled the discussion in a tongue-in-cheek kind of way. So it just sort of stuck, it was kind of serendipitous like everything about this band.

 

We are very excited to announce the TBoH will be on the Cayamo cruise next January!  Tickets, info and the LINEUP here

http://www.cayamo.com/

 

We’re pleased to announce that we’ll be doing 3 shows in Texas with Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real this July.  Check out the tour page for tickets and details.

 

 

http://cincymusic.com/news/2014/03/interview-the-band-of-heathens-tonight-at-the-taft

Interview: The Band of Heathens Tonight at The Taft

Courtney Chavanell

By 

The Band of Heathens is back with its first new album of new material in two years: Sunday Morning Record. They will be appearing at The Taft Theatre tonight!We sat down with Ed Jurdi prior to the show tonight.

I really enjoy the idea of “Sunday Morning Record” being a tool to help people sit back and reconnect with living real life, enriched by their real surroundings; verses the strange human disconnect we experience as a result of our technologically over-connected world.
What aspects of this record do you think best embody that notion?  

I think the wooden sound and acoustic base of the record really embodies that notion sonically.  Lyrically and content wise, the songs really focus on some of the larger universal themes that all people are dealing with in their daily lives. Love, loss, longing, redemption and transcendence.

Was the desire to pursue that idea partly a result of starting families yourselves? Having children often seems to make people re-focus (like a laser beam) on what matters to them, and re-charges their passion, despite the exhaustion of it all.
I don’t think so.  The idea for the title of the album came after we had assembled the songs and put the pieces together.  

Is that what you are partly conveying on the new record?
Having families has certainly been an amazing source of joy and has opened so many doors of learning and growth that we never knew was possible. In the end, I’m not sure we ever really know where some of the ideas and themes of songs come from. I guess the short answer is that they come from living and being in the world.

Lastly, what can Cincinnatians who’ve never experienced BoH live expect from your show?
First and foremost a really fun evening of music.  We’ll explore a bunch of different parts of our catalogue and try to create a unique and special night, for starters. From there, the possibilities are limitless!

 

 27 March 2014 10:10 AM

 Austin quartet Band of Heathens hasn’t worn out the band’s fourth studio album, Sunday Morning Record. The group will play tunes from the record, and older material, too, on Tuesday night at Dan’s Silverleaf, 103 Industrial St.

In 11 songs, Band of Heathens eases into the well-worn seat of indie-folk, seasoning the lot with Red Dirt twang without compromising the record’s rock and roll posture.

Sunday Morning Record was born in the midst of change,” said one of the Heathens’ founding guitarist and singers Gordy Quist. “Life changes, lineup changes, geographic changes. It was a rollercoaster of a year, but that change served the album well and became our muse.”

Ed Jurdi, the other founding guitarist and singer of the Band of Heathens, said the latest record, which is the seventh the band has produced if you count the albums made without studio help, is a snapshot of the band’s most recent upheavals.

“We set out to make a record that chronicled the journey of the band through a really difficult and uncertain time,” Jurdi said. “In the midst of all of this, Gordy and I were writing songs, starting families, moving families and trying to find a thread to hold onto with our music.”

Doors open at 4 p.m. Show starts at 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $10. Cover costs $15 at the door.

 

http://citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-29920-the_band_of_heathens.html

March 26, 2014 – While Austin, Texas’ South by Southwest extravaganza continues to jump the shark due to corporate excess and misdirection, the capitol city continues to be an exceptional music town. The Band of Heathens came out of Austin’s rich music scene with a lot of buzz in the mid-’00s. The group’s first two albums were live projects, showcasing the band’s ability to bring its brand of Americana/Rock & Roll to the masses.

The Band of Heathens’ latest studio recording is Sunday Morning Record and it features new compositions by founding songwriters and guitarists Gordy Quist and Ed Jurdi.

The group has seen some personnel changes over the years, which, along with the usual personal things that happen when one grows older and matures (yes, even musicians), led to Sunday Morning’s more introspective nature.

The current lineup of Heathens features Jurdi and Quist, along with keyboardist Trevor Nealon, who has been in the band for five years now, and new drummer Richard Millsap.

As with all combos that value their time onstage, the subdued nature of the songs on Sunday Morning Record are evolving as the group brings them to life in concert, allowing the electric guitars to take the lead.


THE BAND OF HEATHENS plays the Taft Theatre’s Ballroom Friday with Josh Eagle. Tickets/more infohere.

 

MUSIC REVIEW | Band of Heathens at the Turf Club: Rock and country, blues and gospel Texas style

March 23, 2014

The Band of Heathens at the Turf Club

Saturday night I went to the Turf Club expecting to see Communist Daughter. Much as I like Communist Daughter I was delighted to get there and see that the Band of Heathens was playing. (Johnny and Molly from Communist Daughter played before them.) Luckily I happened to sit next to a huge Band of Heathens fan who filled me in on their backstory. They’re from Austin Texas, they have played for about 10 years and they have a huge following; they concentrate on live shows. As my new friend suggested – if you like rock and country, blues and gospel Texas style, you’ll love them. I do – and I did.

The band recorded the show; you could buy a copy on the way out the door. Apparently they have been doing this for a few years, recording live shows and making them available immediately at the show, however, clued in by my new friend, I knew I could wait until the next day and download the archive from their website. Such a great idea!

The Turf Club was a great location for their music. I always think music with a country twang bounces off the walls of the old polka hangout better than any other genre. From You’re Gonna Miss Me “post romantic haze” to Medicine Man, the music sounds familiar the first time you hear it in an old school rock-country crossover way. The drum beat is consistent and pushes the song along, the twangy guitar pulls it back abut it’s a nice balance. LA County Blues has that more defiant pure country sound. Gris Gris Satchel was a highlight for me, a post-Katrina song about New Orleans, it touching in tune and detail. It’s a song that’s led with guitar and vocals and a 60s-sounding chorus.

I’ll have to catch Communist Daughter when they play next month at the Kill Kancer Benefit (April 18) but I’m pleased to have a new band to follow with the Band of Heathens.

©2014 Ann Treac
 

http://www.musicnewsnashville.com/band-heathens-sunday-morning-record/

 

“The further into life you get, the more you realize that life isn’t black and white, and that there are millions of shades of grey in between,” says Ed Jurdi, member of Americana-leaning The Band Of Heathens. On the Austin band’s fourth and latest studio project, “Sunday Morning Record,” they explore just these kinds of subtleties, in perhaps their most understated effort to date. Their 2011 “Top Hat Crown And The Clapmaster’s Son” album garnered my review that it “is all the time about the band’s musicality and groove. It’s vibrant with a capital V.” Still about musicality and groove, they have taken things down a notch here, and the sound is now easy with a capital E.

Released on their BOH Records label, the band’s album shows a natural evolution, undoubtedly stemming, in part, from a change in the lineup. Three members left since “Top Hat;” new drummer Richard Millsap and various bass players join original members – songwriters/musicians/vocalists Jurdi and Gordy Quist, and Trevor Nealon – and along with producers George Reiff and Steve Christensen, they’ve put together a stripped back, introspective collection of eleven tracks.

Interesting musical transitions within songs stand out, such as the waltz/shuffle combo in opener “Shotgun,” but the meat of the album reveals solid growth. Celtic drum and guitar is squared with lilting harmonies on “Girl With Indigo Eyes,” and remember-when song “Records In Bed” is lots of bass and slippery lap steel with a psychedelic outro. “Since I’ve Been Home” is tender and exquisite in a Beatles’ “Blackbird” kind of way. This band never tries too hard to impress, which creates an attractive welcome-mat soundscape for listeners.

Visit their website www.bandofheathens.com

 

 

http://www.goshennews.com/entertainment/x1387876217/Texas-based-Band-of-Heathens-to-perform-in-Goshen-Tuesday

March 20, 2014 – Scenario: You’ve just bought the new album by The Band of Heathens. “I wonder what this sounds like,” you wonder aloud, instead of just putting the album on and listening to it.

Hint: The title isn’t false advertising.

“Sunday Morning Record” is the latest studio release from the Austin, Texas-based Heathens. It’s a subdued but not sleepy piece of Americana and the prevailing mood fits the title. Put another way, “Record” is not a Venom record.

According to the Heathens’ Ed Jurdi, the title immediately makes sense to the sort of people who listen to albums on Sunday mornings. He also said the songs on “Record” have “kind of a nice little narrative, sonically.”

Goshen listeners can hear part of that narrative live Tuesday night, when The Band of Heathens plays Ignition Music Garage downtown.

A “Record” listener can hear hints of non-Heathens on the album — Nilsson, the Stones in country-ramble mode, The Dead, ’70s singer-songwriter sounds. That said, the influences are pretty deftly incorporated into the band identity.

“I think that’s the idea,” Jurdi said in a phone interview with The Goshen News this week. “…The way you learn how to do what you do is by studying.” And in the case of most musicians, that means listening to other artists.

“I did that by putting on records that I liked and listening to them and learning how to play those songs,” Jurdi said. “Then taking those tools and figuring out how to use them with my own voice in mind.”

Discussing the Heathens’ creative process, Jurdi said, “You’re inspired by something, and you grab that idea out of the air and you start running with it. …You’re using these little touchstone points more as inspiration than as a template.”

“Sunday Morning Record” is the Heathens fourth studio release, and seventh altogether. The band itself, made up of simpatico musicians from the Austin scene, assembled in 2005. In the near decade since, Band of Heathens has released albums that have reached the top spot on the Americana music charts. The group has been honored as Best New Band at the Austin Music Awards, and performed televised sets on PBS’ “Austin City Limits” and the German music program “Rockpalast.”

The group has undergone a line-up shift since its last studio record, 2011’s “Top Hat Crown and the Clapmaster’s Son;” Jurdi and Gordy Quist are the remaining Heathens from the formative days. Jurdi describes a productive creative relationship with Quist in which differences are key.

“We work well writing together because I think we bring different stuff to the table,” he said. “If you ask me exactly what that is, I’m not sure I could tell you. But I do know that after working with him for a while, I think we’re different enough in some ways but also the same enough in some ways in terms of what we’re looking to get out of the music.

“There’s always been a really good yin and yang in our relationship,” Jurdi added. “I’ve kind of found, I guess just in life, that’s a pretty important component in being in a relationship with anyone, whatever the context may be.”

Ignition concert-goers can expect “Sunday Morning Record” to be well-represented. Jurdi indicated the band is having fun playing “Sunday” tracks because those songs are new.

“We’re kind of at a point now where those songs are starting to really develop and take on a life of their own in a live setting,” he said.

On the road, The Band of Heathens also enjoys the freedom of a fluid set list.

“There’s only a few songs we play most of the time,” Jurdi said. “Other than that, though, it’s kind of a mixed bag — which really keeps it interesting for us, and we’ve found it actually keeps it interesting for our fans. Fortunately or unfortunately, we haven’t really had any big hit songs, so we’re not really beholden to have to play a song every night. …We’ve found our fans have a lot of different favorite songs.”

 

If you want to go The Band of Heathens is scheduled to perform at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Ignition Music Garage, 120 E. Washington St., Goshen. Tickets cost $25. For ticket and other information about the show, visit the website www.ignitionmusic.net or call 574-971-8282.

- See more at: http://www.goshennews.com/entertainment/x1387876217/Texas-based-Band-of-Heathens-to-perform-in-Goshen-Tuesday#sthash.FAM0LgUi.dpuf

 

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http://herald-review.com/entertainment/local/band-of-heathens-keeps-chasing-potential/article_402d4a34-77f7-5613-a742-36c811532ce2.html

JIM VOREL H&R Staff Writer

3/14/14 BLOOMINGTON — For every band there come forks in the road, moments where members must either reaffirm their passion for a project or go their separate ways.

When Austin-based Americana group Band of Heathens lost three of their longtime members in 2012, it was one of those moments. Founders Ed Juri and Gordy Quist were left, musical partners who had been in the band together since 2005. It was their call to decide what to do. Thankfully for Band of Heathens fans, their choice seemed obvious.

“It was like a three-minute conversation that we had,” said vocalist Juri, who will lead the band in a Thursday night appearance at Bloomington’s Castle Theatre. “I looked at Gordy and was like, ‘You still want to do this thing?’ We felt there was still a lot of potential and space to explore, and we had a good nucleus to build around.”

Still, replacing half of a six-piece group is by no means an easy feat. This process, coupled with the personal evolution and changes experienced by all members, made the 2013 recording of the band’s most recent album, “Sunday Morning Record,” a more challenging experience than usual. The things that take the longest aren’t even aspects of the band that fans can see or hear. Ultimately, it’s all about relationships.

“The most difficult aspect is really an internal thing,” Juri said. “This is all based on trust, so even when you’re playing with great musicians, it takes awhile to truly come together. In a way, that was reinvigorating, but it was also a challenge to bring all those new guys in. We’re just now getting to the point where I feel like we’re the best we’ve ever been.”

Juri has his bond with Quist to thank for at least some of that. They no longer live in the same half of the country, as Juri moved to Asheville, N.C., last year, but the singer said he and his partner had always possessed the ability to roll and adapt to each other’s lives. Through everything, their friendship and commitment to the band have always won out.

“We have been compatible and flexible as our lives change, and we have a healthy respect for each other,” he said. “The whole group genuinely enjoys each other’s company and is committed to making the music as good as it can be.”

The Americana music of the group has often been reflective of their city of origin, Austin, Texas. The band’s inspiration was discovered there by Juri, who was drawn by the prospect of an unusually vibrant scene for singer-songwriters.

“I initially came there because of all those great songwriters,” he said. “What strikes you is the fact that those guys are doing their job all the time, whenever they’re in town. They gig every weeknight. The city certainly has a love affair with music and supports so many original bands. There’s not a lot of other places like it.”

In many ways, Band of Heathens are still evolving on a nightly basis. They regularly record each one of their gigs and offer the “bootlegs” for purchase and download at the end of the night. Fans collect these bootlegs ravenously and use them to form their own unique mixes of live material. But Juri is listening along as well, analyzing each show with an eye for the future.

“The bootlegs are the clearest indication for us of what’s working and what’s not,” he said. “Lately, it’s working pretty well. I’m excited about how the band is sounding.”

 

 

http://www.musicnewsnashville.com/band-heathens-sunday-morning-record/

by Janet Goodman

February 7. 2014 – “The further into life you get, the more you realize that life isn’t black and white, and that there are millions of shades of grey in between,” says Ed Jurdi, member of Americana-leaning The Band Of Heathens. On the Austin band’s fourth and latest studio project, “Sunday Morning Record,” they explore just these kinds of subtleties, in perhaps their most understated effort to date. Their 2011 “Top Hat Crown And The Clapmaster’s Son” album garnered my review that it “is all the time about the band’s musicality and groove. It’s vibrant with a capital V.” Still about musicality and groove, they have taken things down a notch here, and the sound is now easy with a capital E.

Released on their BOH Records label, the band’s album shows a natural evolution, undoubtedly stemming, in part, from a change in the lineup. Three members left since “Top Hat;” new drummer Richard Millsap and various bass players join original members – songwriters/musicians/vocalists Jurdi and Gordy Quist, and Trevor Nealon – and along with producers George Reiff and Steve Christensen, they’ve put together a stripped back, introspective collection of eleven tracks.

Interesting musical transitions within songs stand out, such as the waltz/shuffle combo in opener “Shotgun,” but the meat of the album reveals solid growth. Celtic drum and guitar is squared with lilting harmonies on “Girl With Indigo Eyes,” and remember-when song “Records In Bed” is lots of bass and slippery lap steel with a psychedelic outro. “Since I’ve Been Home” is tender and exquisite in a Beatles’ “Blackbird” kind of way. This band never tries too hard to impress, which creates an attractive welcome-mat soundscape for listeners.

Visit their website www.bandofheathens.com

 

 
 
 

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